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  • Writer's pictureColleen Nelson

Family Holiday Celebrations (April Through July)

Updated: Mar 12, 2023


I fully enjoy seeing the world through a child’s eyes. Planning activities to celebrate various holidays allows me to take a pause from the day-to-day churn and enjoy life from a child’s perspective. This list below picks up where we left off from Family Holiday Celebrations (Jan through March) (plenitudeco.com).


Easter (First Sunday Following the First Spring Equinox Full Moon)

This is a Christian holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ. This holiday signals the end of lent and represents life after death – a new beginning.


Wax Decorating Eggs (Ages 1 – 3)

Have your child use a clear piece of wax or a white crayon to markup hard boiled eggs. With the clear or white coloring, they will not be able to see the marks. Use a store-bought egg coloring kit to color the eggs. As the eggs come out of the coloring solution point out to them the way their markings are now visible. This is much like faith. We cannot always see it, but we know it is there.


Easter Egg Hunt (Ages 4 – 7)

This may seem like an obvious activity. What can be important is the conversation with children about the Easter Egg Hunt. Before they go out to find eggs you have hidden explain that they are walking in faith to find something they do not know is there. And as they continue to walk in faith, they will find their treasure.


Hide and Seek (Ages 8 – 11)

Organize a large game of hide and seek around your home or the neighborhood. Explain to the children the story of Jesus’ friends going to look for him and finding the tomb empty. And yet they maintained their faith in God and that Jesus was his son. Once everyone has been found talk about the celebration they felt, and that Jesus’s friends must have felt.


Talk and Pray (Ages 12+)

Jesus taught us about love and forgiveness. Use a quite night at home with your preteen and teenagers talking about the things they love. Talk with them about the people they may need to forgive. This may include themselves. Help them write a prayer that can be shared before you eat on Sunday to thank God for the things they love and to ask for help on the things they need to forgive.


May Day (May 1st)

This holiday has a long history and many varied reasons for celebration. The most dominate, now, being the celebration of spring and agricultural growth for the summer.


Make Fruit Snack Bags (Ages 1 – 3)

Have different fruits washed, prepared, and sorted. Put some of each fruit in a bag that can be eaten during the week. I find the more variety in colors the more interested they will be. While assembling talk about how each fruit comes from a tree or a bush that farmers grow for us.


Plant Spring Flowers (Ages 4 – 7)

You can do this outdoors in a small piece of land that you have been wanting to grow flowers. Or you can do it in an available planting pot that can stay in the house. Let your child pick the seed packet or the small plant from the nursery. Through spring and summer talk to them about the importance of water, sunlight, and pruning.


May Day Basket (Ages 8 – 11)

Make small basket to place on your neighbor’s front door. You can do this with plastic cups or even roll a piece of paper like a cone. Fill the cup with snacks and kind words wishing your neighbor abundance and growth for the summer.


Send A Letter (Ages 12+)

Write a letter or send a card to a family member or friend. It is just as important to nurture relationships as is it so to nurture plants. Sending a just thinking of you message in the mail can brighten a person’s day. Keep it simple. And send a couple of them. You can even join them and send to a couple of friends you do not get to see every day.


Mother’s Day (Second Sunday in May)

This is a day that stumps many moms. There is a conflict between ‘I want to spend every moment being a mom’ and ‘I want to take a break and have a moment of peace.’ I hope some of the below options give some peace while you are getting to mom your way through the day.


Memory Walk (Ages 1 – 3)

Take your child for a walk and talk about their memories with mom. You can share your memories with them. You will be surprised what they remember about certain activities. Here is a brief list of topics to ask them about to guide the conversation.

  • Do you remember what I made you for breakfast? What is the best breakfast I made for you?

  • Do you remember when I read you a bedtime story? What is your favorite bedtime book?

  • Do you remember when I sang you song? What is your favorite song we sing?

  • Do you remember the last game we played? What is your favorite game we play?


Picnic at the Park as Kids (Ages 4 – 7)

Plan a picnic of your and their favorite foods. Make sure to bring drinks. I also take wipes for easy cleanup. Spend the time in the park together. Allow yourself to be one of the kids with them. Be silly, play the games. When everyone is hungry take a break to eat and rehydrate. If it rains – Do not Panic. Set the picnic up on the floor. And rather than park games play board games. The important part is to be the kid right along with them.


Their Favorite Breakfast (Ages 8 – 11)

Ask them the week before to make you their favorite breakfast. Do the shopping together. And be willing to try it or eat it even if it is not your favorite. You do not have to do the cooking. And they get to share something they enjoy with you. And if you do not like it, eat it, but be honest and laugh together about it.


Their Favorite Dinner (Ages 12+)

Ask them the week before to make you their favorite breakfast. Do the shopping together. And be willing to try it or eat it even if it is not your favorite. You do not have to do the cooking. And they get to share something they enjoy with you. And if you do not like it, eat it, but be honest and laugh together about it.


Memorial Day (The Last Monday in May)

Each year we celebrate our loved ones who have died, especially veterans. This is a day to be grateful for the sacrifices those before us have made.


Color a Poppy (Ages 1 – 3)

Poppies are a sign of respect. They symbolize remembrance and hope for a peaceful future. This site may be useful for finding a printable sheet. Remembrance Day Poppy Coloring Page - Coloring Home.


Family Photo Albums (Ages 4 – 7)

Pull out the family photo albums. Spend an afternoon sharing pictures and stories of your child’s ancestors. Encourage them to know them through your stories. Point out any family members that were in the military.


Visit a Cemetery or Service (Ages 8 – 11)

Show them how to respect and honor those before them. Some cemeteries have special services for Memorial Day. You can also take flowers and visit your lost and loved ones. I recommend taking gloves and towel with you to the cemetery. It is nice to help clean up the headstones.


Volunteer at a Memorial, Service, or Parade (Ages 12+)

This will require a bit of online research. You can also reach out to your school’s resource office. Showing pre-teens and teens that they can serve their community is a wonderful way to teach them to respect and honor those that came before them. Explain that their acts of service are a way to be grateful to those who sacrificed for their freedoms.


Father’s Day (Third Sunday in June)

This holiday has a similar conflict as Mother’s Day. Hopefully, these ideas give you some ways to connect and build more memories together.


Dad’s Favorite Toys (Ages 1 – 3)

Let yourself go back to being a small child. Go on a toy hunt together and gather up all the toys you would have liked best when you were little. Put them together in the front room. Explain why you would have like them best. And let them tell you why they do ore do not like them while you play with them together.


Take a Hike (Ages 4 – 7)

Find some trails nearby and plan a hike. Pack a lunch to eat during a break in your adventure. Explore and be curious. Let yourself be the kid right alongside your child. Take photos of the fun things you find. Take pictures together.


Their Favorite Breakfast (Ages 8 – 11)

Ask them the week before to make you their favorite breakfast. Do the shopping together. And be willing to try it or eat it even if it is not your favorite. You do not have to do the cooking. And they get to share something they enjoy with you. And if you do not like it, eat it, but be honest and laugh together about it.


Their Favorite Dinner (Ages 12+)

Ask them the week before to make you their favorite breakfast. Do the shopping together. And be willing to try it or eat it even if it is not your favorite. You do not have to do the cooking. And they get to share something they enjoy with you. And if you do not like it, eat it, but be honest and laugh together about it.


Independence Day (July 4th)

On this day we celebrate the United States of American becoming independent from England. This is a day focused on freedom and independence. Both come with responsibility. This is a suitable time to talk with children about the balance of freedom and responsibility.


Little Independence (Ages 1 – 3)

Explain to your little one about independence meaning doing things on their own. Go from room to room having them perform tasks they can do on their own. And talking about tasks they still must have your help with. They will love showing you how much they can do themselves.


Mother May I (Ages 4 – 7)

This is a fun game to do with any number of children. Line them up shoulder to shoulder. Walk away from them to the other side of the room or the yard. Each child takes a turn saying, “Mother May I….” asking to step, run, hop, skip, forward a specific amount of space. And you as Mother get to say yes or no. The goal is for the children to be the first one to reach Mother. They then become Mother and the game starts all over. Children quickly learn that Mother gets to pick the winner. This is an effective way to demonstrate why soldiers fought for our independence from England.


Water Gun and Water Balloon Wars (Ages 8 – 11)

With older children it is good to remind them this is for play and that guns and grenades should only contain water if they are touching them. Divide into two teams. Fill the water balloons and water guns. Determine the battle zone area and rules. Even war has rules. Then, have a family Water War.


Plan a Neighborhood Progressive Treat Party (Ages 12+)

Have them talk to each neighbor and ask if they would like to participate. Have each neighbor provide one type of treat or snack. Everyone gets together and starts at the first house to visit and enjoy the first snack. Then, progress to the next one. This is a really effective way to get familiar with your neighbors and begin building a community.


I hope this list inspires you to start some new traditions within your family and community. You may even be reminded of how magical the world is through your children’s eyes. If you have traditions for these holidays, you enjoy doing together, share them in the comments below.



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